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    Long-Lasting Effects of Sepsis on Circadian Rhythms in the Mouse


    O’Callaghan, Emma K. and Anderson, Sean T. and Moynagh, Paul N. and Coogan, Andrew (2012) Long-Lasting Effects of Sepsis on Circadian Rhythms in the Mouse. PLoS ONE, 7 (10). e47087. ISSN 1932-6203

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    Abstract

    Daily patterns of activity and physiology are termed circadian rhythms and are driven primarily by an endogenous biological timekeeping system, with the master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Previous studies have indicated reciprocal relationships between the circadian and the immune systems, although to date there have been only limited explorations of the long-term modulation of the circadian system by immune challenge, and it is to this question that we addressed ourselves in the current study. Sepsis was induced by peripheral treatment with lipopolysaccharide (5 mg/kg) and circadian rhythms were monitored following recovery. The basic parameters of circadian rhythmicity (free-running period and rhythm amplitude, entrainment to a light/dark cycle) were unaltered in post-septic animals compared to controls. Animals previously treated with LPS showed accelerated re-entrainment to a 6 hour advance of the light/dark cycle, and showed larger phase advances induced by photic stimulation in the late night phase. Photic induction of the immediate early genes c-FOS, EGR-1 and ARC was not altered, and neither was phase-shifting in response to treatment with the 5-HT-1a/7 agonist 8-OH-DPAT. Circadian expression of the clock gene product PER2 was altered in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of post-septic animals, and PER1 and PER2 expression patterns were altered also in the hippocampus. Examination of the suprachiasmatic nucleus 3 months after treatment with LPS showed persistent upregulation of the microglial markers CD-11b and F4/80, but no changes in the expression of various neuropeptides, cytokines, and intracellular signallers. The effects of sepsis on circadian rhythms does not seem to be driven by cell death, as 24 hours after LPS treatment there was no evidence for apoptosis in the suprachiasmatic nucleus as judged by TUNEL and cleaved-caspase 3 staining. Overall these data provide novel insight into how septic shock exerts chronic effects on the mammalian circadian system.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: The definitive version of this article is available at doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047087
    Keywords: immune systems; Sepsis; Circadian Rhythms; Mouse; endogenous biological timekeeping system;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Psychology
    Item ID: 4232
    Depositing User: Dr. Andrew Coogan
    Date Deposited: 28 Feb 2013 09:47
    Journal or Publication Title: PLoS ONE
    Publisher: Public Library of Science
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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