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    The Web of Addiction An Exploration of the Complex Physiological, Psychological, Social and Political Forces Involved in the Development of Addictive Behaviours.


    O'Shea, James (1998) The Web of Addiction An Exploration of the Complex Physiological, Psychological, Social and Political Forces Involved in the Development of Addictive Behaviours. Masters thesis, National University of Ireland Maynooth.

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    Abstract

    This study aimed to critically evaluate contemporary theory on the development of addictive behaviours. It acknowledged the complex dynamic relationships between five key variables including; individual, family, society, "stakeholders" and "addictive" substances in developing an interactive model of addiction. The hypothesis suggested that unitary definitions were inadequate, and that addiction was best understood as a complex phenomenon intimately linked to the prevailing social and political climate. The research employed three complimentary methods of inquiry including; a comprehensive review of relevant literature, a questionnaire administered to a group of adult students (to "reality check" theoretical frameworks) and a semi-structured groupwork session. The principle findings included; that there was a perceived preoccupation with pathological models of addiction, that addictive behaviours may be seen as functional at several levels of society and that drug and alcohol use were seen to be treated dichotomously in Ireland. It was also suggested that the role of gender issues in substance misuse were poorly understood, that the clear link between social disadvantage and problem use was largely ignored by policy makers and that key stakeholders were seen to create the reality of addiction by defining its parameters, diagnosing it and determining appropriate responses.

    Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
    Keywords: Web of Addiction; Complex Physiological; Addictive Behaviours;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Social Sciences > Education
    Item ID: 5134
    Depositing User: IR eTheses
    Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2014 10:31
    URI:

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