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    An Investigation of Hypofrontality in an Animal Model of Schizophrenia Using Real-Time Microelectrochemical Sensors for Glucose, Oxygen, and Nitric Oxide


    Finnerty, Niall J. and Bolger, Fiachra B. and Pålsson, Erik and Lowry, John P. (2013) An Investigation of Hypofrontality in an Animal Model of Schizophrenia Using Real-Time Microelectrochemical Sensors for Glucose, Oxygen, and Nitric Oxide. ACS Chemical Neuroscience, 4. pp. 825-831. ISSN 1948-7193

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    Abstract

    Glucose, O2, and nitric oxide (NO) were monitored in real time in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving animals using microelectrochemical sensors following phencyclidine (PCP) administration. Injection of saline controls produced a decrease in glucose and increases in both O2 and NO. These changes were short-lived and typical of injection stress, lasting ca. 30 s for glucose and between 2 and 6 min for O2 and NO, respectively. Subchronic PCP (10 mg/kg) resulted in increased motor activity and increases in all three analytes lasting several hours: O2 and glucose were uncoupled with O2 increasing rapidly following injection reaching a maximum of 70% (ca. 62 μM) after ca. 15 min and then slowly returning to baseline over a period of ca. 3 h. The time course of changes in glucose and NO were similar; both signals increased gradually over the first hour post injection reaching maxima of 55% (ca. 982 μM) and 8% (ca. 31 nM), respectively, and remaining elevated to within 1 h of returning to baseline levels (after ca. 5 and 7 h, respectively). While supporting increased utilization of glucose and O2 and suggesting overcompensating supply mechanisms, this neurochemical data indicates a hyperfrontal effect following acute PCP administration which is potentially mediated by NO. It also confirms that long-term in vivo electrochemical sensors and data offer a real-time biochemical perspective of the underlying mechanisms.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: The definitive published version of this article is available at DOI: 10.1021/cn4000567
    Keywords: Hypofrontality; brain; electrochemical sensors; real-time monitoring; metabolism; schizophrenia;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Chemistry
    Item ID: 7005
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1021/cn4000567
    Depositing User: John Lowry
    Date Deposited: 03 Mar 2016 15:56
    Journal or Publication Title: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
    Publisher: American Chemical Society
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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