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    Chronic fluoxetine treatment attenuates post-septic affective changes in the mouse


    Anderson, Sean T. and Commins, Sean and Moynagh, Paul N. and Coogan, Andrew (2016) Chronic fluoxetine treatment attenuates post-septic affective changes in the mouse. Behavioural Brain Research, 297. pp. 112-115. ISSN 0166-4328

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    Abstract

    It has been previously demonstrated that the induction of sepsis in rodents results in persistent impairments in affective and cognitive domains. In this study we have examined the impact of chronic treatment with the antidepressant fluoxetine on affective behaviours and hippocampal neuroinflammation and stem cell proliferation in animals that have previously undergone sepsis induced by peripheral treatment with lipopolysaccharide. We find that fluoxetine significantly attenuates post-septic increases in behavioural despair and motivated exploration, whilst also reversing the effects of previous sepsis on activated microglia and stem cell proliferation. These results indicate that conventional antidepressants may be effective in the management of mood disorders in survivors of sepsis.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: We acknowledge funding from John and Pat Hume Scholarshipaward from Maynooth University to support S.T.A.
    Keywords: Sepsis; Fluoxetine; Neuoinflammation; EGR1; Depression; BrdU;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Psychology
    Item ID: 10718
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2015.10.011
    Depositing User: Dr. Sean Commins
    Date Deposited: 12 Apr 2019 13:10
    Journal or Publication Title: Behavioural Brain Research
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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