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    Are prisoners more psychopathic than non-forensic populations? Profiling psychopathic traits among prisoners, community adults, university students, and adolescents.


    Boduszek, Daniel and Debowska, Agata and Sherretts, Nicole and Willmott, Dominic and Boulton, Mike and Kielkiewicz, Krzysztof and Popiolek, Katarzyna and Hyland, Philip (2021) Are prisoners more psychopathic than non-forensic populations? Profiling psychopathic traits among prisoners, community adults, university students, and adolescents. Deviant Behavior, 42 (2). pp. 232-244. ISSN 0163-9625

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    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to compare prisoners (n = 772), community adults (n = 1201), university students (n = 2080), and adolescents (n = 472) on four sets of psychopathic traits (affective responsiveness, cognitive responsiveness, interpersonal manipulation, and egocentricity), using a psychopathy measure which does not index criminal/antisocial behavior – the Psychopathic Personality Traits Scale. Another aim was to examine patterns of co-occurrence between psychopathic personality traits among offending and non-offending populations. ANOVA results indicated significant differences between the four groups on all PPTS dimensions. Adolescents demonstrated greater deficits in affective and cognitive responsiveness than the remaining groups of participants. Prisoners had elevated deficits in cognitive responsiveness, compared with university students and community adults. University students scored higher on interpersonal manipulation than adolescents and prisoners, and higher on egocentricity than community adults and prisoners. Latent profile analysis revealed four distinct classes of psychopathic traits among all samples, although not all classes were qualitatively equivalent across samples. Low psychopathy groups were identified for all samples. There were clear high psychopathy groups for prisoners and university students, with approximately 7% of prisoners and students belonging in the groups. This finding indicates that past research could have over-estimated the prevalence of psychopathy in forensic populations due to inclusion of criminal behavior items in psychopathy assessment.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: Prisoners; Psychopathic; Non-forensic Populations; Profiling; Psychopathic Traits; Community; Adults; University Students; Adolescents;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Psychology
    Item ID: 14081
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1080/01639625.2019.1665221
    Depositing User: Philip Hyland
    Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2021 15:08
    Journal or Publication Title: Deviant Behavior
    Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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