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    A Preliminary Investigation into Eye Gaze Data in a First Person Shooter Game


    Kenny, A and Koesling, H and Delaney, Declan and McLoone, Seamus and Ward, Tomas E. (2005) A Preliminary Investigation into Eye Gaze Data in a First Person Shooter Game. In: 19th European Conference on Modelling and Simulation (ECMS 2005), 1-4 June 2005, Riga, Lativa.

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    Abstract

    This paper describes a study carried out in which the eye gaze data of several users playing a simple First Person Shooter (FPS) game has been recorded. This work shows the design and implementation of a simple game and how the execution of the game can be synchronized with an eye tracking system. The motivation behind this work is to determine the existence of visual psycho-perceptual phenomena, which may be of some use in developing appropriate information limits for distributed interactie media compression algorithms. Only 2 degrees of the 140 degrees of human vision has a high level of detail. It may be possible to determine the areas of the screen that a user is focusing on and render it in high details or pay perticular attention to its contents so as to set appropriate dead reckoning limits. Our experiment show that eye tracking may allow for improvements in rendering and new compression algorithms to be created for an online FPS game.

    Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
    Keywords: Eye Tracking, Networked Games, Psycho-Perceptual Measures
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Computer Science
    Faculty of Science and Engineering > Electronic Engineering
    Item ID: 282
    Depositing User: Dr. Seamus McLoone
    Date Deposited: 08 Sep 2006
    Publisher: ECMS
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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