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    Manipulation of visual information does not change the accuracy of distance estimation during a blindfolded walking task


    Commins, Sean and McCormack, Kelsie and Callinan, Erin and FitzGerald, Helen and Molloy, Eoin and Young, Kerrie (2013) Manipulation of visual information does not change the accuracy of distance estimation during a blindfolded walking task. Human Movement Science, 32. pp. 794-807.

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    Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2013.04.003


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    Abstract

    While humans rely on vision during navigation, they are also competent at navigating non-visually. However, non-visual navigation over large distances is not very accurate and can accumulate error. Currently, it is unclear whether this accumulation of error is due to the visual estimate of the distance or to the locomotor production of the distance. In a series of experiments, using a blindfolded walking test, we examine whether enhancing the visual estimate of the distance to a previously seen target, through environmental enrichment, visual imagery, or repeated exposure would improve the accuracy of blindfold navigation across different distances. We also attempt to decrease the visual estimate in order to see if the opposite effect would occur. Our results would indicate that manipulation of the static visual distance estimate did not change the navigation accuracy to any great extent. The only condition that improved accuracy was repeated exposure to the environment through practice. These results suggest that error observed during blindfold navigation may be due to the locomotor production of the distance, rather than the visual process.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: The definitive version of this article is available at DOI: doi:10.1016/j.humov.2013.04.003
    Keywords: Blindfold navigation; Distance estimation; Visual Idiothetic;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Psychology
    Item ID: 6770
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2013.04.003
    Depositing User: Dr. Sean Commins
    Date Deposited: 12 Jan 2016 16:54
    Journal or Publication Title: Human Movement Science
    Publisher: Elsevier
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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