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    Transformation as Usual? The meanings of a changing labour process for Indiana Aluminium workers


    Mathur, Chandana (1998) Transformation as Usual? The meanings of a changing labour process for Indiana Aluminium workers. Critique of Anthropology, 18. pp. 263-277. ISSN 0308-275X

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    Abstract

    The present era of ’flexible accumulation’ and crisis is widely seen to have engendered distinctive changes in the labour process. The analysis presented here explores the ways in which these transformations are experienced and absorbed by hourly wage workers at an aluminium plant in the United States. Of particular interest are the distinct meanings the workers attach to different managerial innovations; thus, the reordering of shift arrangements provokes worker response (and union action) that is quite different from the reaction inspired by the introduction of cooperative worker-management teams at the plant. Using classical Marxian analytical categories, it may be said that the current regimen of workplace control involves some combination of absolute and relative surplus value strategies. By disaggregating this mix of strategies, these workers’ narratives help cast some light on the currently raging debate about whether or not we are living in an age of globalization and epochal change.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: capitalism; globalization; labour; management; Marxian economics; unions; United States;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Social Sciences > Anthropology
    Item ID: 8378
    Depositing User: Dr. Chandana Mathur
    Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2017 08:22
    Journal or Publication Title: Critique of Anthropology
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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