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    Antibiotic Resistance Gene Detection in the Microbiome Context


    Do, Thi Thuy and Tamames, Javier and Stedtfeld, Robert D. and Guo, Xueping and Murphy, Sinead and Tiedje, James M. and Walsh, Fiona (2018) Antibiotic Resistance Gene Detection in the Microbiome Context. Microbial Drug Resistance, 24 (5). pp. 542-546. ISSN 1076-6294

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    Abstract

    Within the past decade, microbiologists have moved from detecting single antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) to detecting all known resistance genes within a sample due to advances in next generation sequencing. This has provided a wealth of data on the variation and relative abundances of ARGs present in a total bacterial population. However, to use these data in terms of therapy or risk to patients, they must be analyzed in the context of the background microbiome. Using a quantitative PCR ARG chip and 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing, we have sought to identify the ARGs and bacteria present in a fecal sample of a healthy adult using genomic tools. Of the 42 ARGs detected, 12 fitted into the ResCon1 category of ARGs: cfxA, cphA, bacA, sul3, aadE, blaTEM, aphA1, aphA3, aph(2′)-Id, aacA/aphd, catA1, and vanC. Therefore, we describe these 12 genes as the core resistome of this person's fecal microbiome and the remaining 30 ARGs as descriptors of the microbial population within the fecal microbiome. The dominant phyla and genera agree with those previously detected in the greatest abundances in fecal samples of healthy humans. The majority of the ARGs detected were associated with the presence of specific bacterial taxa, which were confirmed using microbiome analysis. We acknowledge the limitations of the data in the context of the limited sample set. However, the principle of combining qPCR and microbiome analysis was shown to be helpful to identify the association of the ARGs with specific taxa.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: microbiome; resistome; feces; human;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Biology
    Faculty of Science and Engineering > Research Institutes > Human Health Institute
    Item ID: 11797
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2017.0199
    Depositing User: Fiona Walsh
    Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2019 15:50
    Journal or Publication Title: Microbial Drug Resistance
    Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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