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    Stigmatization Among Drug-Using Sex Workers Accessing Support Services in Dublin


    Whitaker, Teresa and Ryan, Paul and Cox, Gemma (2011) Stigmatization Among Drug-Using Sex Workers Accessing Support Services in Dublin. Qualitative Health Research, 21 (8). pp. 1086-1100. ISSN 1468-7941

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    Abstract

    Findings from 35 qualitative interviews with drug users who were engaging in or who had engaged in sex work in Dublin, Ireland, illuminated how, because of a result of felt stigma and internalized shame, they tried to hide their drug use, thus endangering their own lives. This group carried multiple layers of stigma because of sex work, drug use (including injecting drug use), and having contracted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV). This stigma was powerfully reinforced by the language routinely used by health professionals. To improve the effectiveness of harmreduction interventions, it is recommended that service providers change their language, in particular in recognition of the human dignity of these clients, but also to help attract and retain drug users in services, and to help reduce the unacceptable mortality levels among drug users.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: addiction / substance use; Europe, Western; health care professionals; hepatitis C; HIV/AIDS; qualitative analysis; sex workers; stigma;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Social Sciences > Sociology
    Item ID: 11971
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732311404031
    Depositing User: Paul Ryan
    Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2019 11:40
    Journal or Publication Title: Qualitative Health Research
    Publisher: SAGE Publications
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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