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    Intern Labour as Regenerative Precarisation in the Cultural and Creative Industries


    Moody, Josh (2020) Intern Labour as Regenerative Precarisation in the Cultural and Creative Industries. SocArXiv. pp. 1-32. (Submitted)

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    Abstract

    Internships are a precarious labour practice often driven by a combination of labour market competition, desirable work, employer advantages and fictional expectations. This article is based on an empirical study of intern labour in the Cultural and Creative Industries in Ireland. The data consists of a survey of workers and interns, and interviews with interns past and present. Through approaching internships as a form of precarisation, and intern labour through the lens of ‘fictional expectations’, this article provides an analysis of intern labour as a form of regenerative precarisation through the self-reinforcing tendencies of action, subjectivity, discursive constructs and social structures. The labour market practice of interning creates discursive, normative and structural patterns of precarisation. These patterns in turn shape subjective and intersubjective expectations of work and life, impacting on the actions that individuals make and thus acting as drivers of further precarisation.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: Internships; cultural and creative industries; precarity; subjectivity; individualisation of risks;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Social Sciences > Sociology
    Item ID: 12310
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.31235/osf.io/7pg3m
    Depositing User: Joshua Moody
    Date Deposited: 30 Jan 2020 15:08
    Journal or Publication Title: SocArXiv
    Refereed: No
    Funders: Irish Research Council
    URI:

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