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    Human iPSC-derived mesoangioblasts, like their tissue-derived counterparts, suppress T cell proliferation through IDO- and PGE-2-dependent pathways


    Li, Ou and English, Karen (2013) Human iPSC-derived mesoangioblasts, like their tissue-derived counterparts, suppress T cell proliferation through IDO- and PGE-2-dependent pathways. F1000 Research, 2 (24).

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    Abstract

    Human mesoangioblasts are currently in a phase I/II clinical trial for the treatment of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. However, limitations associated with the finite life span of these cells combined with the significant numbers of mesoangioblasts required to treat all of the skeletal muscles in these patients restricts their therapeutic potential. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived mesoangioblasts may provide the solution to this problem. Although, the idea of using iPSC-derived cell therapies has been proposed for quite some time, our understanding of how the immune system interacts with these cells is inadequate. Herein, we show that iPSC-derived mesoangioblasts (HIDEMs) from healthy donors and, importantly, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2D patients exert immunosuppressive effects on T cell proliferation. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) play crucial roles in the initial activation of HIDEMs and importantly indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) were identified as key mechanisms involved in HIDEM suppression of T cell proliferation. Together with recent studies confirming the myogenic function and regenerative potential of these cells, we suggest that HIDEMs could provide an unlimited alternative source for mesoangioblast-based therapies.

    Item Type: Article
    Keywords: Human iPSC-derived mesoangioblasts; tissue-derived counterparts; suppress T cell proliferation; IDO- and PGE-2-dependent pathways;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Biology
    Item ID: 6839
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.12688/f1000research.2-24.v1
    Depositing User: Karen English
    Date Deposited: 19 Jan 2016 16:24
    Journal or Publication Title: F1000 Research
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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