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    Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to silver(I) induces a short term protective response


    Smith, Alanna and Rowan, Raymond and McCann, Malachy and Kavanagh, Kevin (2012) Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to silver(I) induces a short term protective response. Biometals, 25 (3). pp. 611-616. ISSN 0966-0844

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    Abstract

    The Ag(I) ion has well established antibacterial and antifungal properties. Exposure of Staphylococcus aureus to MIC80 AgNO3 (3 lg/ml) lead to an increase in the activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase and catalase at 30 min but activity declined by 60 min. In addition, exposure of cells to this metal ion for 1 h lead to increased expression of a number of proteins such as elongation factors Ts, Tu and G, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and triosephosphate isomerase but their expression declined following 4 h exposure. ATP binding cassette transporter protein and oligoendopeptidase F showed increased expression at 4 h. While Ag(I) is a potent antimicrobial agent this work demonstrates that S. aureus can mount a short-term protective response to exposure to the metal ion but that this is eventually overcome.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: The definitive published version of this article is available at DOI: 10.1007/s10534-012-9549-3
    Keywords: Antimicrobial; Silver(I); Staphylococcus; Proteomics; Oxidative stress;
    Academic Unit: Faculty of Science and Engineering > Biology
    Item ID: 6889
    Identification Number: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10534-012-9549-3
    Depositing User: Dr. Kevin Kavanagh
    Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2016 13:21
    Journal or Publication Title: Biometals
    Publisher: Springer Verlag
    Refereed: Yes
    URI:

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